Douglas Robinson

Douglas Robinson

My work as a sculptor has evolved to include the movement in the stone when it is found in its broken or rough shape. I look at these stones for an energy framework from which to proceed to the carved elements. The variation within the stone, in terms of density, colour and composition become the silent undercurrents that assist this type of process carving.

The organic flow of surface tension in this work often hints at plant or animal life as the structures evolve to mimic aspects of reality borrowed from nature. Yet their success lies beyond the allure of mimicry in that the stronger work remains ambiguous enough to confront the viewer with multiple sets of meaningfulness.

Zuni tribal philosophy suggests that degrees of relationship are determined by degrees of resemblance. From our need to relate to the world around us we develop our own visual cues for meaning and resemblance. At the frontiers of visual understanding we may confront new ways of seeing just how the familiar may seem exotic. Although there is a human need to find comfort in the familiar, my work attempts to offer multiple ways of finding your own relationship to new visual forms in stone.